Life According To Brian Finch

See the world through Finch-colored glasses!

1. See the world through Finch-colored glasses!

Brian Finch has always been a creative person—he was pursuing dreams of becoming a famous musician before life, NZT, and the FBI intervened. But just because he's busy solving crimes doesn't mean he lost his creativity. He may have become even more imaginative! While not always exactly accurate, his version tends to be far more entertaining.
Mike and Ike are destined for the limelight—of a puppet theater.

2. Mike and Ike are destined for the limelight—of a puppet theater.

While the FBI tested Brian to see why he was immune to the side effects of NZT, he was sequestered at home under the watch of two agents. Forced to entertain himself with guards who hadn't warmed up to him yet, Brian dubbed them "Mike" and "Ike" before making papier-mâché versions of them for an impromptu play.
He's a card-playing international man of intrigue.

3. He's a card-playing international man of intrigue.

After signing on with the FBI, Brian knew exactly what to expect: wearing a tuxedo, playing baccarat against people wearing monocles, drinking martinis, and having a glamorously dressed Rebecca on his arm. Oh, and he would be playing with Uno cards.

Actually, it turned out nothing like that. But Brian did wear a tuxedo t-shirt and popped into a casino to make some quick cash.
Marcos Ramos is a 70s-style drug kingpin.

4. Marcos Ramos is a 70s-style drug kingpin.

The FBI tasked Brian—along with Mike and Ike—to reconstruct bags and bags of shredded paper. The tedious task turned interesting after they discovered a link to drug dealer Marcos Ramos. Brian pictured the man as a high-rolling mobster, constantly surrounded by beautiful women and armed guards, with a penchant for throwing people to his piranhas.
Confiding in Rebecca is a path to a bad demise. A hilariously bad demise.

5. Confiding in Rebecca is a path to a bad demise. A hilariously bad demise.

After giving an FBI file to Sands (Senator Edward Morra's operative), NZT-Brian made a video for non-NZT-Brian to describe what could happen if he told Rebecca about Morra’s plan. While going through the variety of ways it could play out—in claymation, no less—the most creative were his potential death-by-firework and drowning-via-toilet. 
A fugitive's life would be greatly improved by prison.

6. A fugitive's life would be greatly improved by prison.

On his way to the bathroom, Brian inadvertently caught a drug ring member's brother. The two forged a connection, and Naz forced Brian to exploit the relationship in an attempt to find their suspect. In order to get the boy to spill his criminal sibling's whereabouts, Finch spun a tale about how much his brother's life would improve if the FBI could just catch him. The benefits included the fugitive becoming completely reformed, well-educated, and, eventually able to start a brand-new life.
The target of a black ops mission has to be a comic book hero.

7. The target of a black ops mission has to be a comic book hero.

Finch pictured Aleksey Basayev—a man the CIA was hunting down—as a superhero gone rogue, who eats raw fish caught by hand and fights bad guys. Naturally, this could only be depicted comic book-style.
Black ops missions are a bit like a treasure hunt.

8. Black ops missions are a bit like a treasure hunt.

After being kidnapped for a black ops mission on what was supposed to be his "sick" day, Finch passed the time wandering the woods looking for the target. It felt a lot better with the group's trek depicted as an adventure instead of a deadly CIA takedown.
When Naz goes to DC, she suddenly turns into an old-school, 16-bit video game star.

9. When Naz goes to DC, she suddenly turns into an old-school, 16-bit video game star.

As Naz left for headquarters, Finch described her as "going to DC, kicking ass and taking names." It was kind of her fault when she told him to picture that however he wanted, because he did—in 16-bit video game form.
Finding pirates apparently requires an actual pirate map.

10. Finding pirates apparently requires an actual pirate map.

While consoling Naz's daughter and desperately following leads to find her kidnapped niece, Finch got in contact with a boy who had intel about the suspected pirates. As he listened via an old-school radio, he pictured the victim's situation as if she was on a fairytale-style map featuring a ship searching for treasure.